People

Learn more about the people who make up CABES.
Hector Abruna

Héctor Abruña

Center Director / Researcher: Electrocatalysis, Supports, Methods

Emile M. Chamot ProfessorDepartment of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Cornell University
(607) 255-4720hda1@cornell.edu

Professor Abruña, Emile M. Chamot Professor of Chemistry, completed his graduate studies with Royce W. Murray and Thomas J. Meyer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and was a postdoctoral research associate with Allen J. Bard at the University of Texas at Austin. After a brief stay at the University of Puerto Rico, he came to Cornell in 1983. Professor Abruña was the director of a previous EFRC, the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2). His research group focuses on the study of electrochemical phenomena of new materials, using a wide variety of techniques, with emphasis on applications such as fuel cells, batteries, and molecular assemblies for molecular electronics. He is an AAAS Fellow and recipient of numerous awards, including an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a John S. Guggenheim Fellowship, a J. W. Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, the Faraday Medal of the Royal Society, and the Conway Prize . He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018.  He was recently awarded the Allen J. Bard Medal for 2019, one of the highest honors of the Electrochemical Society.

Professor Abruña, Emile M. Chamot Professor of Chemistry, completed his graduate studies with Royce W. Murray and Thomas J. Meyer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and was a postdoctoral research associate with Allen J. Bard at the University of Texas at Austin. After a brief stay at the University of Puerto Rico, he came to Cornell in 1983. Professor Abruña was the director of a previous EFRC, the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2). His research group focuses on the study of electrochemical phenomena of new materials, using a wide variety of techniques, with emphasis on applications such as fuel cells, batteries, and molecular assemblies for molecular electronics. He is an AAAS Fellow and recipient of numerous awards, including an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a John S. Guggenheim Fellowship, a J. W. Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, the Faraday Medal of the Royal Society, and the Conway Prize . He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018.  He was recently awarded the Allen J. Bard Medal for 2019, one of the highest honors of the Electrochemical Society.

Thomas Arias

Tomás Arias

Thrust Leader: Theory

ProfessorPhysics, Cornell University
(607) 255-0450taa2@cornell.edu

Linking the ab initio quantum mechanical description of materials to the physical behavior of real materials, involving identification of problems where the quantum perspective can make a significant impact, exploitation of theoretical techniques and supercomputer architectures to carry out large scale quantum calculations, and development of new theoretical techniques to link ab initio calculations with phenomena on larger scales. Current application areas include mechanical properties of nanoscale systems including carbon nanotubes, fundamental processes involved in crystal growth, quantum mechanics of systems in contact with a solution, physics of novel solar cell systems

Linking the ab initio quantum mechanical description of materials to the physical behavior of real materials, involving identification of problems where the quantum perspective can make a significant impact, exploitation of theoretical techniques and supercomputer architectures to carry out large scale quantum calculations, and development of new theoretical techniques to link ab initio calculations with phenomena on larger scales. Current application areas include mechanical properties of nanoscale systems including carbon nanotubes, fundamental processes involved in crystal growth, quantum mechanics of systems in contact with a solution, physics of novel solar cell systems

Kathy Ayers

Kathy Ayers

Advisory Board Member

Vice President of Research and Development Proton OnSite - Nel Hydrogen

Dr. Katherine Ayers joined Proton OnSite in 2007 and is currently Vice President of Research and Development. Her technical expertise spans multiple electrochemical devices including batteries, fuel cells/electrolyzers, and solar cells. She has responsibility for Proton’s R&D strategy in membrane-based electrochemical devices, and maintaining and executing Proton’s multi-year technology roadmap. She is currently a member of the Scientific Advisory Board at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy Energy Innovation Hub with lead member institutions Caltech and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Prior to joining Proton, Dr. Ayers spent 10 years at Energizer Battery Company, with responsibility for strategic materials direction, diagnosis of polarization losses and low battery service, and fundamental insight on other production issues. She received her B.S. degree in Chemistry/Chemical Physics at U.C. San Diego and was awarded the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship in 1991. She also received the Urey Award as the top chemistry graduate in 1993. She attended Caltech on an NSF Graduate Fellowship (1993-1996) and earned her Ph.D. in chemistry under the direction of Professor Nathan Lewis in 1997.

Dr. Katherine Ayers joined Proton OnSite in 2007 and is currently Vice President of Research and Development. Her technical expertise spans multiple electrochemical devices including batteries, fuel cells/electrolyzers, and solar cells. She has responsibility for Proton’s R&D strategy in membrane-based electrochemical devices, and maintaining and executing Proton’s multi-year technology roadmap. She is currently a member of the Scientific Advisory Board at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy Energy Innovation Hub with lead member institutions Caltech and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Prior to joining Proton, Dr. Ayers spent 10 years at Energizer Battery Company, with responsibility for strategic materials direction, diagnosis of polarization losses and low battery service, and fundamental insight on other production issues. She received her B.S. degree in Chemistry/Chemical Physics at U.C. San Diego and was awarded the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship in 1991. She also received the Urey Award as the top chemistry graduate in 1993. She attended Caltech on an NSF Graduate Fellowship (1993-1996) and earned her Ph.D. in chemistry under the direction of Professor Nathan Lewis in 1997.

Joel Brock

Joel Brock

Researcher: Methods

Given Foundation Professor of EngineeringApplied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University
(607) 255-9006joel.brock@cornell.edu

After receiving his doctoral degree, Brock spent two years as a postdoctoral research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and then joined the Cornell faculty in 1989. He served as Director of the School of Applied & Engineering Physics from 2000-2007. At Cornell, he is affiliated with the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR), the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), and is Director of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). He is a member of the American Crystallography Association, the Materials Research Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Engineering Education, Sigma Xi, the Union of Concerned Scientists, and The Materials Society. Brock is a fellow of the American Physical Society.

After receiving his doctoral degree, Brock spent two years as a postdoctoral research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and then joined the Cornell faculty in 1989. He served as Director of the School of Applied & Engineering Physics from 2000-2007. At Cornell, he is affiliated with the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR), the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), and is Director of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). He is a member of the American Crystallography Association, the Materials Research Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Engineering Education, Sigma Xi, the Union of Concerned Scientists, and The Materials Society. Brock is a fellow of the American Physical Society.

Michelle Buchanan

Michelle Buchanan

Advisory Board Member

Deputy for Science and TechnologyOak Ridge National Laboratory

As Deputy for Science and Technology, Dr. Buchanan oversees one of the nation’s most extensive portfolios of research and development, spanning physical and materials sciences, energy and engineering sciences, computing and computational sciences, biological and environmental sciences, neutron sciences, and global security, for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. Before assuming her current position in October 2017, Dr. Buchanan was the Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences for more than a decade.  She served as director of the ORNL Chemical Sciences Division from October 2000 to November 2004 and as associate director of the ORNL Life Sciences Division from January 1999 to September 2000. She initiated the Center for Structural Molecular Biology at ORNL, serving as its director from 1999 to 2003, and led the Organic and Biological Mass Spectrometry Group in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (now the Chemical Sciences Division) from 1986 to 1999. She joined ORNL in 1978 after earning a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin.

As Deputy for Science and Technology, Dr. Buchanan oversees one of the nation’s most extensive portfolios of research and development, spanning physical and materials sciences, energy and engineering sciences, computing and computational sciences, biological and environmental sciences, neutron sciences, and global security, for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. Before assuming her current position in October 2017, Dr. Buchanan was the Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences for more than a decade.  She served as director of the ORNL Chemical Sciences Division from October 2000 to November 2004 and as associate director of the ORNL Life Sciences Division from January 1999 to September 2000. She initiated the Center for Structural Molecular Biology at ORNL, serving as its director from 1999 to 2003, and led the Organic and Biological Mass Spectrometry Group in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (now the Chemical Sciences Division) from 1986 to 1999. She joined ORNL in 1978 after earning a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin.

Peng Chen

Peng Chen

Researcher: Methods

Peter J. W. Debye ProfessorChemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University
(607) 254-8533pc252@cornell.edu

Professor Chen’s Group develops and applies single-molecule approaches to interrogate and understand the function and dynamics of nanomaterials and biomacromolecules, with the goal of acquiring fundamental chemical knowledge for developing better strategies for energy conversion as well as for curing and preventing diseases.

Professor Chen’s Group develops and applies single-molecule approaches to interrogate and understand the function and dynamics of nanomaterials and biomacromolecules, with the goal of acquiring fundamental chemical knowledge for developing better strategies for energy conversion as well as for curing and preventing diseases.

Geoffrey Coates

Geoffrey Coates

Thrust Leader: Membranes

Tisch University ProfessorDepartment of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University
(607) 255-5447gc39@cornell.edu

Prof. Coates is the Tisch University Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell University. His teaching and research interests involve science at the interface of organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry. The broader impacts of his research include benign polymers and chemical synthesis, the utilization of renewable resources, and materials safe and economical energy storage and conversion.

Prof. Coates is the Tisch University Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell University. His teaching and research interests involve science at the interface of organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry. The broader impacts of his research include benign polymers and chemical synthesis, the utilization of renewable resources, and materials safe and economical energy storage and conversion.

Francis DiSalvo

Researcher: Electrocatalysis and Supports Thrusts

John A. Newman Professor, EmeritusDepartment of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Cornell University
(607) 255-7238fjd3@cornell.edu

The DiSalvo Group’s research focuses on the synthesis, characterization and potential applications of new solid state materials. Current research interests include: 1) the development of general methods for the synthesis of compositionally and structurally complex intermetallic nano-particles for possible application as fuel cell catalysts, 2) the discovery and application of mesostructured conducting oxide and nitride materials as catalyst supports for electrochemical systems, including fuel cells, 3) higher energy and power density materials for battery technologies.

The DiSalvo Group’s research focuses on the synthesis, characterization and potential applications of new solid state materials. Current research interests include: 1) the development of general methods for the synthesis of compositionally and structurally complex intermetallic nano-particles for possible application as fuel cell catalysts, 2) the discovery and application of mesostructured conducting oxide and nitride materials as catalyst supports for electrochemical systems, including fuel cells, 3) higher energy and power density materials for battery technologies.

Rob DiStasio

Robert DiStasio

Researcher: Theory

Assistant ProfessorChemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University
(607) 255-4233distasio@cornell.edu

By utilizing the computational techniques of quantum and statistical mechanics, the DiStasio research group seeks to address challenging problems in theoretical chemistry and further our understanding of fundamental systems and processes of importance throughout all disciplines of chemistry, ranging from organic/inorganic chemistry (i.e., catalyst design, solvation/solvent effects) to biochemistry (i.e., stability, structure, and function of proteins, enzymes, and DNA/RNA, drug discovery) and materials science (i.e., molecular crystal polymorphism, forward and inverse design of novel materials).

By utilizing the computational techniques of quantum and statistical mechanics, the DiStasio research group seeks to address challenging problems in theoretical chemistry and further our understanding of fundamental systems and processes of importance throughout all disciplines of chemistry, ranging from organic/inorganic chemistry (i.e., catalyst design, solvation/solvent effects) to biochemistry (i.e., stability, structure, and function of proteins, enzymes, and DNA/RNA, drug discovery) and materials science (i.e., molecular crystal polymorphism, forward and inverse design of novel materials).

Jiye Fang

Jiye Fang

Researcher: Electrocatalysis

Associate ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University
(607) 777-3752jfang@binghamton.edu

Jiye Fang’s work in the laboratory is synthesizing and manipulating functional nanocrystals. He is also investigating the relevant physical and chemical phenomena on these size- and shape-controlled nanocrystals. The emphases are advanced processing technology, shape-control and formation mechanisms of nanocrystals, surface structure of nanocrystals, superstructure of nanocrystal assembly.

Jiye Fang’s work in the laboratory is synthesizing and manipulating functional nanocrystals. He is also investigating the relevant physical and chemical phenomena on these size- and shape-controlled nanocrystals. The emphases are advanced processing technology, shape-control and formation mechanisms of nanocrystals, surface structure of nanocrystals, superstructure of nanocrystal assembly.

Juan Feliu

Juan Feliu

Advisory Board Member

Professor of Physical ChemistryUniversity of Alicante

Addressed problems of research trying to establish relationships between the structure and the surface composition and electrochemical reactivity, in the fields of electrochemistry of surfaces and Electrocatalysis fundamentals. To this end, are prepared in single crystals of Platinum, gold, rhodium and Palladium with different orientation surface, including base levels, terraced surfaces and surfaces containing corners in a controlled manner. The modification of the surface composition is adsorbing submonocapas of atoms, trying to preserve the structure of the substrate. The surface properties are characterized using various atomic or molecular probes including charged species adsorbed on the surface. The electrocatalycs properties are focused mainly in the oxidation of organic and nitrogenous molecules. In this activity, he is the co-author of more than 180 publications and has given over 60 conferences at different congresses and meetings.

Addressed problems of research trying to establish relationships between the structure and the surface composition and electrochemical reactivity, in the fields of electrochemistry of surfaces and Electrocatalysis fundamentals. To this end, are prepared in single crystals of Platinum, gold, rhodium and Palladium with different orientation surface, including base levels, terraced surfaces and surfaces containing corners in a controlled manner. The modification of the surface composition is adsorbing submonocapas of atoms, trying to preserve the structure of the substrate. The surface properties are characterized using various atomic or molecular probes including charged species adsorbed on the surface. The electrocatalycs properties are focused mainly in the oxidation of organic and nitrogenous molecules. In this activity, he is the co-author of more than 180 publications and has given over 60 conferences at different congresses and meetings.

Giulia Galli

Advisory Board Member

Liew Family Professor of Molecular EngineeringUniversity of Chicago

Giulia Galli is the Liew Family professor of Electronic Structure and Simulations in the Institute for Molecular Engineering and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Chicago. She also holds a Senior Scientist position at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Prior to joining UChicago and ANL, she was Professor of Chemistry and Physics at UC Davis (2005-2013) and the head of the Quantum Simulations group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (1998-2005). She holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a recipient of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Science and Technology Award, the Department of Energy Award of Excellence, the 2018 Materials Research Society Theory Award, the 2019 David Adler Lectureship in Materials Physics and the 2019 Nelson W. Taylor Award. She served as chair of the Extreme Physics and Chemistry of Carbon Directorate of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) in 2010-2013 and she is currently the director of MICCoM (Midwest Integrated Center for Computational Materials), established by DOE in 2015. Her research activity is focused on the development and use of theoretical and computational methods to understand and predict the properties and behavior of materials (solids, liquids and nanostructures) from first principles.

Giulia Galli is the Liew Family professor of Electronic Structure and Simulations in the Institute for Molecular Engineering and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Chicago. She also holds a Senior Scientist position at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Prior to joining UChicago and ANL, she was Professor of Chemistry and Physics at UC Davis (2005-2013) and the head of the Quantum Simulations group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (1998-2005). She holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a recipient of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Science and Technology Award, the Department of Energy Award of Excellence, the 2018 Materials Research Society Theory Award, the 2019 David Adler Lectureship in Materials Physics and the 2019 Nelson W. Taylor Award. She served as chair of the Extreme Physics and Chemistry of Carbon Directorate of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) in 2010-2013 and she is currently the director of MICCoM (Midwest Integrated Center for Computational Materials), established by DOE in 2015. Her research activity is focused on the development and use of theoretical and computational methods to understand and predict the properties and behavior of materials (solids, liquids and nanostructures) from first principles.

Emmanuel Giannelis

Emmanuel Giannelis

Researcher: Supports

Walter R. Read Professor of EngineeringMaterials Science and Engineering, Cornell University
(607) 255-9680epg2@cornell.edu

Giannelis is the Walter R. Read Professor of Engineering and the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education in the College of Engineering. His research interests include Nanomaterials for Energy, Biomedical, and Environmental Applications. His group is internationally recognized as one of the leading groups in nanohybrids and nanocomposites. He is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and of the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society. He has won the 2014 Cooperative Research Award from the American Chemical Society, and he is a member of the European Academy of Sciences.

Giannelis is the Walter R. Read Professor of Engineering and the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education in the College of Engineering. His research interests include Nanomaterials for Energy, Biomedical, and Environmental Applications. His group is internationally recognized as one of the leading groups in nanohybrids and nanocomposites. He is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and of the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society. He has won the 2014 Cooperative Research Award from the American Chemical Society, and he is a member of the European Academy of Sciences.

Craig Gittleman

Craig Gittleman

Advisory Board Member

Engineering Group ManagerFuel Cell Materials & Analysis, General Motors
  • 22 years experience in industrial R&D with 18 years experience in electrochemical energy systems and materials including fuel cells and Li-ion batteries
  • 12 years experience in R&D management with excellent track records for innovation, government, industry and academic colloabariations, technology transfer and people development
  • Ambassador for U.S. Automotive OEMs for Fuel Cell R&D needs
  • Initiation and oversight of numerous multimillion dollar joint development programs
  • Facilitation and writing of successful proposals for government funding
  • Coauthored 28 U.S. patents and pending patent applications, 26 peer-reviewed papers and three book chapters
  • Regular invited lecturer at technical conferences, university and national lab seminars and U.S. Department of Energy workshops
  • 22 years experience in industrial R&D with 18 years experience in electrochemical energy systems and materials including fuel cells and Li-ion batteries
  • 12 years experience in R&D management with excellent track records for innovation, government, industry and academic colloabariations, technology transfer and people development
  • Ambassador for U.S. Automotive OEMs for Fuel Cell R&D needs
  • Initiation and oversight of numerous multimillion dollar joint development programs
  • Facilitation and writing of successful proposals for government funding
  • Coauthored 28 U.S. patents and pending patent applications, 26 peer-reviewed papers and three book chapters
  • Regular invited lecturer at technical conferences, university and national lab seminars and U.S. Department of Energy workshops
Tobias Glossmann

Tobias Glossmann

Advisory Board Member

Principal Systems EngineerE-Mobility Group , Mercedes-Benz Research and Development North America

Tobias Glossmann is Principal Systems Engineer and Project Leader for Advanced Battery Technology in the E-Mobility Group at Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America (MBRDNA). His responsibilities include monitoring of technology trends related to battery materials and systems and also management of joint development and research projects between MBRDNA or its affiliates with North American companies, universities, and National Labs. He is the Principal Investigator for a project in the Department of Energy’s Battery500 Seedlings Program. Tobias has established business relationships to companies with emphasis on solutions that promise high energy density battery technology. During his career he made major contributions to numerous battery related solutions in the electronic, thermal, and controls fields that can be found in Mercedes-Benz vehicles, some have been patented.

Tobias Glossmann is Principal Systems Engineer and Project Leader for Advanced Battery Technology in the E-Mobility Group at Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America (MBRDNA). His responsibilities include monitoring of technology trends related to battery materials and systems and also management of joint development and research projects between MBRDNA or its affiliates with North American companies, universities, and National Labs. He is the Principal Investigator for a project in the Department of Energy’s Battery500 Seedlings Program. Tobias has established business relationships to companies with emphasis on solutions that promise high energy density battery technology. During his career he made major contributions to numerous battery related solutions in the electronic, thermal, and controls fields that can be found in Mercedes-Benz vehicles, some have been patented.

Sharon Hammes-Schiffer

Sharon Hammes-Schiffer

Researcher: Theory

John Gamble Kirkwood Professor of ChemistryYale Department of Chemistry, Yale University
(203) 436-3936sharon.hammes-schiffer@yale.edu

Research in the Hammes-Schiffer group centers on the development and application of theoretical and computational methods for describing chemical reactions in condensed phases and at interfaces. Our overall objective is to elucidate the fundamental physical principles underlying charge transfer reactions, dynamics, and quantum mechanical effects in chemical, biological, and interfacial processes. Our research encompasses the development of analytical theories and computational methods, as well as applications to a wide range of experimentally relevant systems. The group is divided into three general areas: proton-coupled electron transfer reactions, enzymatic processes, and non-Born-Oppenheimer electronic structure methods.

Research in the Hammes-Schiffer group centers on the development and application of theoretical and computational methods for describing chemical reactions in condensed phases and at interfaces. Our overall objective is to elucidate the fundamental physical principles underlying charge transfer reactions, dynamics, and quantum mechanical effects in chemical, biological, and interfacial processes. Our research encompasses the development of analytical theories and computational methods, as well as applications to a wide range of experimentally relevant systems. The group is divided into three general areas: proton-coupled electron transfer reactions, enzymatic processes, and non-Born-Oppenheimer electronic structure methods.

Marc Koper

Marc Koper

Advisory Board Member

Professor of Catalysis and Surface ChemistryUniversiteit Leiden

Marc Koper (1967) studied chemistry at Utrecht University, and obtained his PhD (cum laude) with Prof. J.H. Sluyters from Utrecht University in 1994 on “Far-from-equilibrium phenomena in electrochemical systems: instabilities, oscillations and chaos”.  From 1995 to 1997 he was a postdoctoral Marie Curie Fellow in the group of Prof. W. Schmickler at the University of Ulm (Germany). In 1997, he returned to the Netherlands to join the group of Prof. R.A. van Santen at Eindhoven University of Technology, where he initially was a Fellow of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and later associate professor. His interests are in electrochemistry, electrocatalysis, (electrochemical) surface science, and theoretical and computational (electro-)chemistry.

Marc Koper (1967) studied chemistry at Utrecht University, and obtained his PhD (cum laude) with Prof. J.H. Sluyters from Utrecht University in 1994 on “Far-from-equilibrium phenomena in electrochemical systems: instabilities, oscillations and chaos”.  From 1995 to 1997 he was a postdoctoral Marie Curie Fellow in the group of Prof. W. Schmickler at the University of Ulm (Germany). In 1997, he returned to the Netherlands to join the group of Prof. R.A. van Santen at Eindhoven University of Technology, where he initially was a Fellow of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and later associate professor. His interests are in electrochemistry, electrocatalysis, (electrochemical) surface science, and theoretical and computational (electro-)chemistry.

Lena Kourkoutis

Lena Kourkoutis

Thrust Co-Leader: Methods / Researcher: Membranes

Assistant ProfessorApplied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University
(607) 255-9121lena.f.kourkoutis@cornell.edu

Kourkoutis received a Diploma in Physics from the University of Rostock, Germany in 2003, and then moved to Ithaca where she was awarded a PhD in 2009. As a Humboldt Research Fellow Kourkoutis spent 2011-2012 exploring cryo-electron microscopy in the Molecular Structural Biology Group at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. She returned to Cornell as a Postdoctoral Associate in 2012 and joined the Applied and Engineering Faculty in 2013. She has been selected by Microscopy Society of America as the recipient of the prestigious 2013 Albert Crewe Award.

Kourkoutis received a Diploma in Physics from the University of Rostock, Germany in 2003, and then moved to Ithaca where she was awarded a PhD in 2009. As a Humboldt Research Fellow Kourkoutis spent 2011-2012 exploring cryo-electron microscopy in the Molecular Structural Biology Group at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. She returned to Cornell as a Postdoctoral Associate in 2012 and joined the Applied and Engineering Faculty in 2013. She has been selected by Microscopy Society of America as the recipient of the prestigious 2013 Albert Crewe Award.

Thomas E. Mallouk

Thomas E. Mallouk

Thrust Leader: Supports

Vagelos Professor of ChemistryDepartment of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania
mallouk@sas.upenn.edu

The Mallouk Group is interested in several problems in materials chemistry, including photoelectrochemistry, electrochemical energy conversion, low-dimensional physical phenomena, and motion on the nanoscale. Our approach involves the synthesis of materials that contain molecular and/or solid state components, and the study of their structure, assembly, and properties by a variety of physical techniques.

The Mallouk Group is interested in several problems in materials chemistry, including photoelectrochemistry, electrochemical energy conversion, low-dimensional physical phenomena, and motion on the nanoscale. Our approach involves the synthesis of materials that contain molecular and/or solid state components, and the study of their structure, assembly, and properties by a variety of physical techniques.

Manos Mavrikakis

Manos Mavrikakis

Researcher: Theory

Vilas Distinguished Achievement ProfessorChemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison
(608) 262-9053emavrikakis@wisc.edu

New materials with properties tailored to specific applications often represent the heart of novel chemical processes and important technological advances. The fundamental understanding of the correlation between materials structure and properties is the key to designing new materials with the desired properties. The primary focus of our research is on the atomic-scale materials design, based on first-principles electronic structure calculations. We are applying state-of-the-art theoretical methods to study a range of important surface phenomena including adsorption, diffusion and chemical reactions on a variety of catalytic and semiconductor surfaces.

New materials with properties tailored to specific applications often represent the heart of novel chemical processes and important technological advances. The fundamental understanding of the correlation between materials structure and properties is the key to designing new materials with the desired properties. The primary focus of our research is on the atomic-scale materials design, based on first-principles electronic structure calculations. We are applying state-of-the-art theoretical methods to study a range of important surface phenomena including adsorption, diffusion and chemical reactions on a variety of catalytic and semiconductor surfaces.

David Muller

David A. Muller

Thrust Co-Leader: Electrocatalysis / Researcher: Methods

Samuel B. Eckert Professor of EngineeringApplied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University
(607) 255-4065david.a.muller@cornell.edu

David Muller is the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering in the School of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University, and the co-director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science. His current research interests include the atomic-scale characterization and control of matter for applications in energy storage and conversion, exploring new phases of two-dimensional materials that cannot exist in the bulk, and developing a new generation of probability-current detectors and algorithms for measuring physical properties in an electron microscope.

David is a graduate of the University of Sydney and received a Ph.D. from Cornell University in the field of Physics. As a scientist at Bell Labs, he applied his research on imaging single atoms and atomic-scale spectroscopy to determine the physical limits on how small a transistor can be made. His work more generally has focused on the development of scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy as quantitative tools for atomic-resolution materials analysis, and its application to unraveling connections between electronic-structure changes on the atomic scale and the macroscopic behavior of materials. This includes systems as diverse as fuel cells, batteries, turbine blades, and two-dimensional superconductors.

David is a fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Microscopy Society of America, and recipient of the MSA Burton Medal and MAS Duncumb Award.

David Muller is the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering in the School of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University, and the co-director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science. His current research interests include the atomic-scale characterization and control of matter for applications in energy storage and conversion, exploring new phases of two-dimensional materials that cannot exist in the bulk, and developing a new generation of probability-current detectors and algorithms for measuring physical properties in an electron microscope.

David is a graduate of the University of Sydney and received a Ph.D. from Cornell University in the field of Physics. As a scientist at Bell Labs, he applied his research on imaging single atoms and atomic-scale spectroscopy to determine the physical limits on how small a transistor can be made. His work more generally has focused on the development of scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy as quantitative tools for atomic-resolution materials analysis, and its application to unraveling connections between electronic-structure changes on the atomic scale and the macroscopic behavior of materials. This includes systems as diverse as fuel cells, batteries, turbine blades, and two-dimensional superconductors.

David is a fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Microscopy Society of America, and recipient of the MSA Burton Medal and MAS Duncumb Award.

Paul Mutolo

Executive Director

Senior Research AssociateCenter for Alkaline-based Energy Solutions, Cornell University
(607) 255-4928pfm2@cornell.edu

Paul F. Mutolo is the Executive Director of CABES, as well as Director of External Partnerships for the Energy Materials Center at Cornell.   A fuel cell chemist, Paul has been working in the energy sector for nearly 20 years.

Paul F. Mutolo is the Executive Director of CABES, as well as Director of External Partnerships for the Energy Materials Center at Cornell.   A fuel cell chemist, Paul has been working in the energy sector for nearly 20 years.

Kevin Noonan

Kevin Noonan

Researcher: Membranes

Associate ProfessorDepartment of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University
(412) 268-3128noonan@andrew.cmu.edu

Research in our group is focused on the synthesis of new compounds possessing main group elements to impact polymer chemistry and catalysis. The advent of synthetic polymer chemistry has had an enormous impact on our modern world. Though most commercial polymeric materials are made from organic synthons, the incorporation of main group elements or transition metals into polymer backbones can afford materials with unique properties. The synthetic preparation of these materials remains challenging and continued development will result in unique macromolecular architectures. New design strategies to incorporate inorganic elements such as boron and phosphorus into electronic materials will be explored.

Research in our group is focused on the synthesis of new compounds possessing main group elements to impact polymer chemistry and catalysis. The advent of synthetic polymer chemistry has had an enormous impact on our modern world. Though most commercial polymeric materials are made from organic synthons, the incorporation of main group elements or transition metals into polymer backbones can afford materials with unique properties. The synthetic preparation of these materials remains challenging and continued development will result in unique macromolecular architectures. New design strategies to incorporate inorganic elements such as boron and phosphorus into electronic materials will be explored.

Bryan Pivovar

Bryan Pivovar

Researcher: Membranes

Group Research ManagerChemistry, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
(303) 275-3809bryan.pivovar@nrel.gov

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Fusce ac felis sit amet ligula pharetra condimentum. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc, quis gravida magna mi a libero. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Suspendisse feugiat. Sed libero. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. In dui magna, posuere eget, vestibulum et, tempor auctor, justo. Sed magna purus, fermentum eu, tincidunt eu, varius ut, felis. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Praesent ut ligula non mi varius sagittis. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Maecenas egestas arcu quis ligula mattis placerat. Quisque malesuada placerat nisl. Phasellus leo dolor, tempus non, auctor et, hendrerit quis, nisi. Cras non dolor.

Andrej Singer

Andrej Singer

Thrust Leader: Methods

Assistant ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering, Cornell University
as3689@cornell.edu

Andrej Singer received his Ph.D. degree (2012) in Physics from the University of Hamburg, Germany in the lab of Prof. Edgar Weckert and Prof. Ivan Vartanyants, following a Physics diploma from the University of Muenster, Germany. He studied the properties of new x-ray sources, particularly their ability to generate interference patterns, similar to lasers in optics. He then worked as a Postdoc in the lab of Prof. Oleg Shpyrko at the University of California San Diego and applied coherent x-ray scattering techniques to study a wider range of materials, spanning from fundamental correlated electron materials and applied “real” materials in operando devices to photonic crystals, in particular those present in nature.

Andrej Singer received his Ph.D. degree (2012) in Physics from the University of Hamburg, Germany in the lab of Prof. Edgar Weckert and Prof. Ivan Vartanyants, following a Physics diploma from the University of Muenster, Germany. He studied the properties of new x-ray sources, particularly their ability to generate interference patterns, similar to lasers in optics. He then worked as a Postdoc in the lab of Prof. Oleg Shpyrko at the University of California San Diego and applied coherent x-ray scattering techniques to study a wider range of materials, spanning from fundamental correlated electron materials and applied “real” materials in operando devices to photonic crystals, in particular those present in nature.

Eugene Smotkin

Eugene Smotkin

Advisory Board Member

Co-founder, Chair of the Board of DirectorsNuvant Systems

Eugene Smotkin obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1989. Dr. Smotkin co-founded NuVant Systems in 1999 and is Chairman of the Board of Directors. He is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Northeastern University in Boston. He has 20 years experience in fuel cell R&D; awarded over $14 million in government and industry grants, has over 100 peer-reviewed articles and 8 patents. He was admitted as a Fellow of the Society of Innovators of Northwest Indiana in 2013. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Electrochemical Society and is the Faculty adviser to the Boston Electrochemical Society Student Chapter.

Eugene Smotkin obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1989. Dr. Smotkin co-founded NuVant Systems in 1999 and is Chairman of the Board of Directors. He is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Northeastern University in Boston. He has 20 years experience in fuel cell R&D; awarded over $14 million in government and industry grants, has over 100 peer-reviewed articles and 8 patents. He was admitted as a Fellow of the Society of Innovators of Northwest Indiana in 2013. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Electrochemical Society and is the Faculty adviser to the Boston Electrochemical Society Student Chapter.

Jin Suntivich

Jin Suntivich

Researcher: Electrocatalysis, Methods

Assistant ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering, Cornell University
(607) 255-9730jsuntivich@cornell.edu

Jin Suntivich is an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University. Jin received his B.A. in Integrated Science and B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University. Afterward, Jin went to obtain his Sc.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT, where his research focused on finding a structure-property relation that controls the electrochemical activity of transition metal oxides and nanoparticles for fuel cells, electrolyzers, and metal-air batteries. Jin conducted his postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard University Center for the Environment. There, he worked on understanding the light-matter interaction in titanium oxides and the role of non-equilibrium structure on the surface chemistry and the carrier lifetimes. His interest is in developing rational strategies for designing new materials for energy and environmental applications.

Jin Suntivich is an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University. Jin received his B.A. in Integrated Science and B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University. Afterward, Jin went to obtain his Sc.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT, where his research focused on finding a structure-property relation that controls the electrochemical activity of transition metal oxides and nanoparticles for fuel cells, electrolyzers, and metal-air batteries. Jin conducted his postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard University Center for the Environment. There, he worked on understanding the light-matter interaction in titanium oxides and the role of non-equilibrium structure on the surface chemistry and the carrier lifetimes. His interest is in developing rational strategies for designing new materials for energy and environmental applications.

Piotr Zelenay

Piotr Zelenay

Thrust Co-Leader: Electrocatalysis

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Aliquam lobortis. Fusce neque. Vivamus consectetuer hendrerit lacus. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; In ac dui quis mi consectetuer lacinia. Aenean viverra rhoncus pede. Ut leo. Suspendisse non nisl sit amet velit hendrerit rutrum. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Curabitur vestibulum aliquam leo. Morbi mollis tellus ac sapien. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Etiam vitae tortor. Vivamus laoreet. Phasellus blandit leo ut odio. Nulla neque dolor, sagittis eget, iaculis quis, molestie non, velit.

Lin Zhuang

Lin Zhuang

Advisory Board Member

ProfessorCollege of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University

Lin Zhuang received his Ph.D. in electrochemistry in 1998 at Wuhan University, and has been a full professor in Wuhan University since 2003. He was a visiting scientist at Cornell University in 2004–2005, and an adjunct professor of Xiamen University. He is a recipient of National Science Foundation of China for Distinguished Young Scholars and Chang Jiang Professorship appointed by the Ministry of Education of China. He served as an associate editor of Acta Physico-Chimica Sinica, and is going to be an associate editor of ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering. He has been an editorial board member of several journals including J. Phys. Chem., J. Electroanal. Chem. and Sci. ChinaChem. He was a vice chair of the physical electrochemistry division of ISE (2011–2012) and the chair of China section of ECS (2010–2011), and is the president elect of the Chinese Society of Electrochemistry (CSE). His research has been focused on electrocatalysis and electrochemical energy technology.

Prof. Lin Zhuang is known as a pioneer scientist of alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs), a new fuel-cell technology without the need of precious catalysts. He reported the first prototype of APEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts (PNAS 2008), and has been leading the development of this field, including the recent milestone achievement of 2 W/cm2 in single-cell power density (Angew. Chem. 2019). In addition to fuel cells, he also works on other energy-related areas, such as water electrolysis and CO2 reduction.

Lin Zhuang received his Ph.D. in electrochemistry in 1998 at Wuhan University, and has been a full professor in Wuhan University since 2003. He was a visiting scientist at Cornell University in 2004–2005, and an adjunct professor of Xiamen University. He is a recipient of National Science Foundation of China for Distinguished Young Scholars and Chang Jiang Professorship appointed by the Ministry of Education of China. He served as an associate editor of Acta Physico-Chimica Sinica, and is going to be an associate editor of ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering. He has been an editorial board member of several journals including J. Phys. Chem., J. Electroanal. Chem. and Sci. ChinaChem. He was a vice chair of the physical electrochemistry division of ISE (2011–2012) and the chair of China section of ECS (2010–2011), and is the president elect of the Chinese Society of Electrochemistry (CSE). His research has been focused on electrocatalysis and electrochemical energy technology.

Prof. Lin Zhuang is known as a pioneer scientist of alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs), a new fuel-cell technology without the need of precious catalysts. He reported the first prototype of APEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts (PNAS 2008), and has been leading the development of this field, including the recent milestone achievement of 2 W/cm2 in single-cell power density (Angew. Chem. 2019). In addition to fuel cells, he also works on other energy-related areas, such as water electrolysis and CO2 reduction.